The map of Ottawa to the GHG begins

Le plan d’Ottawa pour les GES se met en branle

Photo: Jason Franson, The canadian Press
Since 1 January, the industrial emitters that emit at least 50,000 tons of greenhouse gases per year, and settled in Ontario, New Brunswick, Manitoba, Prince Edward island or Saskatchewan are subject to a pricing system based on the performance of the federal government.

In the beginning of the new year, the part of the federal system of carbon pricing is applicable to the industries came into force in the provinces have refused to implement an equivalent formula. The levy on fuels, which will affect most directly the citizens, will be applied from April in the provinces concerned.

Since 1 January, the industrial emitters that emit at least 50,000 tons of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per year, and settled in Ontario, New Brunswick, Manitoba, Prince Edward island or Saskatchewan are subject to the pricing system that is based on performance (STFR) federal. For each of the sectors, emissions limits are established, beyond which companies have to pay penalties, and buy offset credits or purchase credits from other emitters had in excess. The extraction, processing and production of bitumen and crude oil are part of the activities covered.

In the provinces recalcitrant, the grumbling continues. Toronto and Regina, and are currently conducting a defiance of the judicial order to cancel the carbon tax, even if Ottawa announced it would pay a lump sum to the citizens at the time of their declaration of income — a strategy meant to encourage Canadians to adopt a sober lifestyle in carbon without, however, penalize them.

The second component of the federal system, which will apply to the way of a tax on gasoline and other fossil fuels, will be implemented on 1 April. It will be equal to $ 20 for each tonne of carbon dioxide in 2019, the equivalent of about four cents per litre of gasoline. This amount will increase by $ 10 per year, up to $ 50 in 2022.

A penalty of $ 20 per tonne will be imposed on the industries qualifying for the STFR, which will exceed the limits established by Ottawa. The permissible emissions will be modulated in function of the production — a limit of 0,733 tonne of CO2 per tonne of grey cement, for example. Allowable emissions are set at 80 % of the current average for each sector, with the exception of a few industries subject to greater international competition. The thresholds for the iron, steel and certain other substances involved in the production of fertilizers are set at 90% of current emissions ; those for cement or lime, to 95 %.

The money collected by the STFR will be distributed, province by province, to the large industrial emitters in order to promote the development of green technologies.

The fees on fuels, which will come into force in the spring, will not be charged to manufacturers whose emissions are already regulated by the STFR. So, while the citizens are going to pay a royalty on all the oil and gas that they burn, the large industries will only be penalized for 5, 10 or 20 % that they emit in excess. A situation that denounces the leader of the conservatives Andrew Scheer when he refers to ” exemptions massive for the big emitters “. For the New Year, Mr. Scheer gave a press conference on this theme in Regina and has relayed a message to the anti-carbon tax on its social networks. The promise to cancel the carbon tax will probably be at the heart of the conservative strategy in view of the federal elections this year.

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